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Typographic basics

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Guidelines for novice designers

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Typographic basics

  1. 1. Typographical
  2. 2. Font features Typography Cap Height Ascenders Descenders Baseline X-Height
  3. 3. Character parts Typ-o-graf-e Axis Ear Hook Bar Counter Terminal Serif
  4. 4. Letter form Hxg Hxg Hxg Hxg Ariel Times NR Geo Slab Hattenschweiler
  5. 5. Kerning Inter-character spacing Time Unkerned type Time Kerned type TNT
  6. 6. Tracking
  7. 7. Leading (Line spacing) Leading refers to the space between lines. It can be tightened or expanded as needed to fill space. (1) Leading refers to the space between lines. It can be tightened or expanded as needed to fill space. (1.4) Leading refers to the space between lines. It can be tightened or expanded as needed to fill space. (1.25) Leading refers to the space between lines. It can be tightened or expanded as needed to fill space. (.8)
  8. 8. Relationships  Type is a building block  Three types of relationships  Concordant  Conflicting  Contrasting
  9. 9. Concordant  Use one font  Use variations on that font  Size  Italic  Bold  Color  Seen as calm, formal
  10. 10. For example . . .
  11. 11. Conflicting  Use of two or more fonts that are similar (same family)  Creates a visual dissonance  Should be avoided
  12. 12. For example . . .
  13. 13. Contrast  Strong contrast attracts  Simple way to create interest  Creates energy on a page  May involve 2 or more fonts  Requires careful planning
  14. 14. For example . . .
  15. 15. Oldstyle Diagonal stress Serifs on lowercase letters are slanted Moderate thick/thin transition in the stroke
  16. 16. Oldstyle
  17. 17. Modern Vertical stress Radical thick/thin transition in the stroke Serifs are thin and horizontal
  18. 18. Modern
  19. 19. Slab serif Serifs are horizontal and thick (slabs) Little or no thick/thin transition of contrast in the strokes Little vertical stress
  20. 20. Slab serif
  21. 21. Sans serif No stress because there’s no thick/thinNo serifs No thick/thin transition in the strokes
  22. 22. Sans serif
  23. 23. Connected Script
  24. 24. Unconnected Script
  25. 25. Decorative
  26. 26. Typographic samples
  27. 27. Typography exists to honor content Robert Bringhurst, The Elements of Typographic Style

Guidelines for novice designers

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