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The growth mindset: The power of acknowledging potential

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Thinking our capabilities are determined by past success or failure, leads to a way of thinking that psychologist Carol Dweck classified as a ‘fixed mindset.’ This is where we think ‘I’m not good at languages,’ or ‘I’m no good at technology,’ or ‘I’m not a natural authority figure,’ or ‘that’s just not the way things happen here.’ This kind of thinking is not open to change, but all learning requires being open to change.

In these slides, Denise Metzger will give theoretical and practical ideas on how to help teachers and managers move from a ‘fixed’ to ‘growth’ mindset to actively seek and excel in changing educational contexts, in order to learn new ways to be successful.

The growth mindset: The power of acknowledging potential

  1. 1. Denise Metzger Education Manager, UNSW Global The Growth Mindset: The Power of Acknowledging Potential
  2. 2. where we are today…  When did you last feel smart?  2 things you’re naturally good at  2 things you’re naturally bad at
  3. 3. outline  IQ test  What is it and why is it important?  How can we do it?
  4. 4. intelligence test people have a certain amount of intelligence and can’t do much to change it people can always substantially change how intelligent they are
  5. 5. intelligence test - identify children not benefitting from their programs - to change educational programs Alfred Binet
  6. 6. It’s not about judging ability; It’s about noticing the gap, and bridging the gap.
  7. 7. intelligence test people can increase their basic intelligence
  8. 8. fixed mindset growth mindset intelligence / ability is innate It’s just who I am. intelligence / ability can be developed It’s not who I am, it’s what I can be with effort. Carol Dweck, (2006)
  9. 9. 5th graders You’re good at puzzles! You can get better if you try and ask for help! (fixed) (growth) interested only when they did well right away interested no matter how well they did
  10. 10. When have you walked away?
  11. 11. The fixed mindset makes people non-learners. Hong Kong University (fixed) (growth) No, thanks Yes, please!
  12. 12. “This student just doesn’t try to learn. She…  isn’t motivated. She doesn’t want to be here.  is lazy. She’s used to things being easier.  doesn’t get that the way we teach requires active participation.  just isn’t that smart.  thinks language ability / intelligence is fixed. She feels personally judged / de-motivated by correction. Intent Personality Culture Mindset Intelligence
  13. 13. DEP students – failed mid-term (fixed) (fixed)(growth)  But C’s so smart! He’ll be okay. How can we motivate them to try differently?
  14. 14. (fixed) (fixed) How can we motivate them to try differently? I just don’t have what it takes… stress depression cheating Smart people don’t have to try. I just have to be smart.
  15. 15. from fixed to growth mindset: feedback  You made a good effort!  You’re a very clever student. I know you can do this.  If you keep working, you’ll get better.  You’re a natural! You did that so fast?
  16. 16. from fixed to growth mindset: feedback ? You made a good effort!  You’re a very clever student. I know you can do this. ? If you keep working, you’ll get better.  You’re a natural! You did that so fast!  You need to strengthen the connections you’re making in your brain.  Summarise the feedback I just gave you in three sentences.
  17. 17. from fixed to growth mindset: making it explicit  workshops / online lessons  learning about learning
  18. 18. define learning - acquiring new knowledge & skills - by making physical changes to neural connections
  19. 19. from fixed to growth mindset: in management  Who do you hire? How do you interview for growth mindset?  What kind of feedback do you give?  Where are you backing away from challenging growth? If you hire ‘naturals’ (smart, talented), how do you support them to take risks?
  20. 20. from fixed to growth mindset: in ourselves  identifying our own fixed-mindset areas  risking failure and taking feedback Where do you back away from challenge? Name your fixed mindset. Talk to it.
  21. 21. where we are today…  When did you last feel smart? (flawless or learning)  2 things you’re naturally good at  2 things you’re naturally bad at
  22. 22. Don’t just do the things where you shine, Try at the things where you fail
  23. 23. … yet Denise Metzger d.Metzger@unswglobal.unsw.edu.au
  • riazleghari1

    Jul. 22, 2021

Thinking our capabilities are determined by past success or failure, leads to a way of thinking that psychologist Carol Dweck classified as a ‘fixed mindset.’ This is where we think ‘I’m not good at languages,’ or ‘I’m no good at technology,’ or ‘I’m not a natural authority figure,’ or ‘that’s just not the way things happen here.’ This kind of thinking is not open to change, but all learning requires being open to change. In these slides, Denise Metzger will give theoretical and practical ideas on how to help teachers and managers move from a ‘fixed’ to ‘growth’ mindset to actively seek and excel in changing educational contexts, in order to learn new ways to be successful.

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